6 Things To Check Off The List Before Moving Out with Your Roommates

Moving Out with Your Roommates
Moving Out with Your Roommates

For anyone with a long-term roommate, moving out may incite a wide range of feelings, including enthusiasm to make your new home your own, as well as grief to leave behind what you are familiar with. And if you’re parting ways with your long-time roommates, you’ll need to add an extra layer of planning to ensure you’re all on the same page and ready for move-in success, no matter how bittersweet it is.

But before venting out all your sadness with farewell shots at the nearest neighborhood bar, take a look at some pointers on how to prevent squabbles with your roommates and guarantee a smooth moving out with your roommates.

1. Check in with each other 

Check-in with each other
Check-in with each other

In the midst of the stress of moving, it’s easy to overlook important tasks like canceling bills, and some individuals in your shared house may be straining to combine packing with other commitments like employment. Make sure you and your roommate check in with each other frequently, whether through house meetings or texting.

Keep each other informed of what has been accomplished and what remains to be completed, and assist if anyone in the group is experiencing difficulty. 

2. Clear up who pays for what 

Clear up who pays for what
Clear up who pays for what

Talking about bills can be difficult, but putting it off until the last minute may cost you both money if services are not terminated on time. Many utility companies demand a month’s notice before you move out, so keep that in mind. Also, if you terminate services before the conclusion of a contract, you may be charged a cancellation fee.

Moving out with roommates adds an added degree of thought because various bills may be in different names, and only the account holder has the authority to cancel the service. Determine who is responsible for each bill and assign tasks accordingly. 

3. Create a moving checklist

Create a moving checklist
Create a moving checklist

Whether you are moving together, or to two completely different apartments, take out the pencils and paper and consider what has to be moved or packed. Who is going to pay the bills? Who is going to take care of all the moving boxes? And, if you require one, who will make the necessary arrangements with the moving company?

As you discuss who will do what and divide up the labor, you will release some tension and be able to create a strategy and schedule that works with your roommate. You may also pin a list to the fridge so that everyone can check off each item on your list of duties as they complete them.

4. Choose a moving company

Choose a moving company
Choose a moving company

Having someone else do all of the hard work for you is an excellent approach to alleviate stress. If you decide to employ a moving company, make sure to schedule them at least 30 days in advance for a long-distance relocation and at least two weeks in advance for a local move.

If money is an issue and hiring a moving company is not an option, solicit the assistance of as many friends and family members as possible, and rent or borrow the largest vehicle you can afford. The more individuals who are willing to assist, the less fatigued — and hangry — you and your housemates will be.

5. Hiring a cleaner

Hiring a cleaner
Hiring a cleaner

Giving the house a thorough cleaning before you leave might help you receive your whole security deposit back.

When it comes time for the major clean-up, everyone is likely to be exhausted after a day of shifting boxes, and the last thing you’ll want to do is to vacuum. Furthermore, cleaning in a shared house may be difficult at best, especially when everyone has different opinions of what constitutes “clean.” However, if you all work together, hiring a cleaner, or a team of cleaners, to come in and perform a thorough job on the now-empty property may be reasonably affordable.

6. Split up your belongings

Split up your belongings
Split up your belongings

Living with roommates frequently entails splitting the expense of large-ticket things. As a result, there may be items in your house that have no apparent owner. You may have all chipped in to buy a couch or table, and if you’re all moving, you’ll have to determine who gets what.

If you must empty the house, go through each room and write a list of who will take each thing. Getting this done can perhaps prevent any last-minute squabbles about who gets to retain the TV.

Moving from one house to another may be a difficult task, moving out with your roommates is even more so. As you progress through the process, make an effort to speak with your roommates as much as possible to ensure that everyone is on the same page. And with these pointers, you’ll be more prepared to live with your roommates. In case you are looking for a new house to rent or move to, check out our list of ready for rent houses this September, many of which are at amazing discounts.